Excerpt from the last letter to his wife by Robert Falcon Scott

Dear it is not easy to write because of the cold – 70° below zero and nothing but the shelter of our tent – you know I have loved you, you know my thoughts must have constantly dwelt on you and oh dear me you must know that quite the worst aspect of this situation is the thought that I shall not see you again – The inevitable must be faced – you urged me to be leader of this party and I know you felt it would be dangerous I’ve taken my place throughout, haven’t I?

God bless you my own darling I shall try and write more later – I go on across the back pages.

Since writing the above we have got to within 11 miles of our depot with one hot meal and two days cold food and we should have got through but have been held for four days by a frightful storm.

I think the best chance has gone we have decided not to kill ourselves but to fight it to the last for that depot but in the fighting there is a painless end so don’t worry.

I have written letters on odd pages of this book — will you manage to get them sent? You see I am anxious for you and the boy’s future — make the boy interested in natural history if you can, it is better than games they encourage it at some schools – I know you will keep him out in the open air — try and make him believe in a God, it is comforting.

Oh my dear my dear what dreams I have had of his future and yet oh my girl I know you will face it stoically — your portrait and the boy’s will be found in my breast and the one in the little red Morocco case given by Lady Baxter.

There is a piece of the Union flag I put up at the South Pole in my private kit bag together with Amundsen’s black flag and other trifles — give a small piece of the Union flag to the King and a small piece to Queen Alexandra and keep the rest a poor trophy for you!

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2 Comments

Filed under Dialogue

2 responses to “Excerpt from the last letter to his wife by Robert Falcon Scott

  1. Robert Falcon Scott was born in Plymouth, England on 6 June 1868, and died on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica on 29 March 1912, aged 43 years.

    “Make the boy interested in natural history” – Peter Scott was knighted in 1973 for his contribution to the conservation of wild animals. He was one of the founders of the World Wildlife Fund.

  2. You can read the entire letter and see the original pages as well at:
    http://inspire.wwt.org.uk/view-scotts-last-letter/

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