Excerpt from “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams ~~Dolphins~~

picture-HitchhikersGuideIt is an important and popular fact that things are not always what they seem. For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much – the wheel, New York, wars, and so on – whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man – for precisely the same reasons.

Curiously enough, the dolphins had long known of the impending destruction of the planet Earth and had made many attempts to alert mankind to the danger; but most of their communications were misinterpreted as amusing attempts to punch footballs or whistle for titbits, so they eventually gave up and left the Earth by their own means shortly before the Vogons arrived.

The last ever dolphin message was misinterpreted as a surprisingly sophisticated attempt to do a double-backwards-somersault through a hoop whilst whistling the ‘Star-Spangled Banner’, but in fact the message was this: So Long, and thanks for all the fish.

In fact there was only one species on the planet more intelligent than dolphins, and they spent a lot of their time in behavioural-research laboratories running round inside wheels and conducting frighteningly elegant and subtle experiments on man. The fact that once again man completely misinterpreted this relationship was entirely according to these creatures’ plans.

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1 Comment

Filed under Fiction, Literature

One response to “Excerpt from “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams ~~Dolphins~~

  1. Douglas Adams was born in Cambridge, England on 11 March 1952, and died in Santa Barbara, California, USA on 11 May 2001, aged 49 years.
    ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ was originally a radio comedy broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1978, eventually being published as a series of five books between 1979 and 1992.

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