The Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde released by Georgie Fame

Bonnie and Clyde were pretty lookin’ people
But I can tell you people
They were the devil’s children,
Bonnie and Clyde began their evil doin’
One lazy afternoon down Savannah way,
They robbed a store, and high-tailed outa that town
Got clean away in a stolen car,
And waited till the heat died down,
Bonnie and Clyde advanced their reputation
And made the graduation
Into the banking business.
“Reach for the sky” sweet-talking Clyde would holler
As Bonnie loaded dollars in the dewlap bag,
Now one brave man-he tried to take ’em alone
They left him Iyin’ in a pool of blood,
And laughed about it all the way home.
Bonnie and Clyde got to be public enemy number one
Running and hiding from ev’ry American lawman’s gun.
They used to laugh about dyin’,
But deep inside ’em they knew
That pretty soon they’d be lyin’
Beneath the ground together
Pushing up daisies to welcome the sun
And the morning dew.
Acting upon reliable information
A fed’ral deputation laid a deadly ambush.
When Bonnie and Clyde came walking in the sunshine
A half a dozen carbines opened up on them.
Bonnie and Clyde, they lived a lot together
And finally together they died.

 

picture-BalladBonnieClyde-Fame

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1 Comment

Filed under Lyrics

One response to “The Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde released by Georgie Fame

  1. ‘The Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde’ was released in 1967, and reached Number One on the UK Singles Chart. It was written by the renowned English songwriters Mitch Murray and Peter Callander.
    The song was inspired by the release of the film, ‘Bonnie and Clyde’, starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway.
    Bonnie Parker (1 October 1910 – 23 May 1934) and Clyde Barrow (24 March 1909 – 23 May 1934) were American criminals during the Great Depression. Together with other gang members they are believed to have killed at least nine police officers and committed several civilian murders. The couple were ambushed and killed in North Louisiana by law officers.

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