Monthly Archives: March 2018

Excerpt from “The Fly” by Richard Chopping ~~Seduction~~

Simmering down, the bovine audience turned, once more, their moons to the sun’s rays of the cinema screen. O’Flattery glanced for a second at his neighbour, the altercation with the attendant having at last broken in on his concentration. He found to his horrified amazement that he was looking into the uneasy orbs of the Office caretaker, which gazed back into his with the sloppy devotion of a pet dog. Not knowing what to do, he smiled involuntarily and was more than surprised to feel a gentle pressure against his leg from the hot thigh next to his. So disgusted was he that he instantly dismissed such a thought, telling himself as he looked fixedly at the screen that he must have been mistaken.
O’Flattery was once more lost in the complexities of the film’s action, caught up in the tension of suspense which permeated the black and white shadow drama which continued to unweave. He moved his legs, as far as he dared, towards the other side of his seat, until the man on that side in his turn gave him a suspicious look. Then he concentrated wholeheartedly on the film. Mrs Macklin oozed seduction, putting all her feminity into her glowing looks, her artful nudges and the sly squeezings of her person against her reluctant neighbour, whose attention, despite the gripping nature of the film, was soon forced to switch once more to flesh and blood human movement, rather than flat photographic images.
Emboldened by the dark, the furtive harpy laid a fat hand upon O’Flattery’s knee. Its effect could not have been more electrifying if she had placed a red hot branding iron upon her prey. He leapt from his seat and careered with flailing limbs down the row, up the aisle and out of the cinema as if a fiend was after him.

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Excerpt from “One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez ~~Ice~~

They insisted that their father take them to see the overwhelming novelty of the sages of Memphis that was being advertised at the entrance of a tent that, according to what was said, had belonged to King Solomon. They insisted so much that José Arcadio Buendía paid the thirty reales and led them into the center of the tent, where there was a giant with a hairy torso and a shaved head, with a copper ring in his nose and a heavy iron chain on his ankle, watching over a pirate chest. When it was opened by the giant, the chest gave off a glacial exhalation. Inside there was only an enormous, transparent block with infinite internal needles in which the light of the sunset was broken up into colored stars. Disconcerted, knowing that the children were waiting for an immediate explanation,
José Arcadio Buendía ventured a murmur:
“It’s the largest diamond in the world.”
“No,” the gypsy countered. “It’s ice.”
José Arcadio Buendía, without understanding, stretched out his hand toward the cake, but the giant moved it away. “Five reales more to touch it,” he said. José Arcadio Buendía paid them and put his hand on the ice and held it there for several minutes as his heart filled with fear and jubilation at the contact with mystery. Without knowing what to say, he paid ten reales more so that his sons could have that prodigious experience. Little José Arcadio refused to touch it. Aureliano, on the other hand, took a step forward and put his hand on it, withdrawing it immediately. “It’s boiling,” he exclaimed, startled. But his father paid no attention to him. Intoxicated by the evidence of the miracle, he forgot at that moment about the frustration of his delirious undertakings and Melquíades’ body, abandoned to the appetite of the squids. He paid another five reales and with his hand on the cake, as if giving testimony on the holy scriptures, he exclaimed:
“This is the great invention of our time.”

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